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Movember Discount

Posted by on Nov 19, 2013 | 0 comments

Movember is men’s health awareness month, so for men out there: do your family a favor and have yourself screened regularly for testicular and prostate cancer. And while you’re at it, do your family another favor and make sure that you have a will and trust in place, should something happen to you. If you haven’t already done this, you’re in luck: for anyone who references this mustache logo and sends an email to office@thegellerlawgroup.com by 5PM on November 22, we will offer 10% discount on our will and trust...

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(18 Year Old) Birthday – Benefits and Blues

Posted by on Aug 15, 2013 | 0 comments

Are you the parent of an 18-year-old? Do you have a child in college? Congratulations! You are one step closer to launching your child into the world and towards a goal of independent living! A child over 18-years-old is considered adults under the law, and this transition to adulthood brings exciting new privileges. Your adult child can now (in theory!) handle adult responsibilities such as voting, serving on a jury, buying and selling stocks, and entering into legally binding contracts. But what you might not know is that, with this single birthday, you lose many of the rights to your child’s information that you have grown so accustomed to over their lifetime. You will no longer have access to your child’s records-academic, financial, or medical. Thus, you may be footing the bill for college, but you will not be given access to any of your student’s college records, including his financial records. You will not be given access to any bank account records, credit card bills or financial accounts. Medical providers are no longer permitted to discuss any health care concerns with you-your adult child’s records are protected under HIPAA (Federal Health Information Portability and Accountability Act). Like all adults, your child needs to protect himself–but he probably still wants his parents’ assistance every now and again. He may need your help with important matters at college. He may need you to have access to his financial accounts. He may need you to advocate on his behalf in a medical emergency. These goals can be accomplished by executing documents such as a Power of Attorney for financial and legal matters and an Advanced Medical Directive, ensuring that medical decisions are made in accordance with his preferences. The Geller Law Group can guide you through the process of preparing the necessary documents to ease your child into adulthood and to protect his wishes in the event of an emergency. These critical documents can provide you with peace of mind as your child ventures outside of the nest. If you are interested in creating a Power of Attorney Document and Medical Directive for your children, contact us for a initial phone consultation, where we can discuss your needs, goals, and questions. Schedule your consultation by sending a quick email to...

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Online Legal Tools: The New and Unimproved Legal Docs

Posted by on Jul 11, 2013 | 0 comments

We know, we know. Why should you pay a lawyer to draft your will or trust document when you can do it online in about ten minutes and for a bargain price? The websites look pretty professional, and they have great names about zooming and rockets. How can a law firm compare with that? Unfortunately, as wonderful as the online option sounds, as this article from Consumer Reports explains, using an online legal tool to create your legal documents is about as effective as using a medical website to diagnose and treat a major illness. It looks good at first, but as you put in your symptoms, you irrationally conclude that you are probably dying from what is really just a minor illness. You now have plenty to worry about, and no treatment from a knowledgeable professional. At the end of the day, you make an appointment and head to the doctor. Similarly, using websites to draft important legal documents can lead to disastrous results for your family or for your business. Some situations have literally resulted with children ending up in foster care due to inadequate wills. As Consumer Reports shows, these websites might lead you to add sections to your will that contradict other portions, causing a probate court to throw out both or either of the conflicting provisions. The documents may be drafted for the wrong jurisdiction, which might mean that the probate court refuses to honor the documents and your estate passes as though you never wrote a will. Business contracts must be customized to your specific business. Online legal tools create vague, unhelpful documents that do not meet the needs of most families or small businesses. As quick, easy and cheap as these websites appear, ultimately they are too good to be true. The results cause more confusion than comfort, and often simply waste your time and your money. If you want to be sure that your future,your family’s future, and the future of your business are well looked after, we suggest you consult a real live lawyer. If you are interested in creating will and/or trust documents or documents for your business, contact us for a initial phone consultation, where we can discuss your needs, goals, and your questions. Schedule your consultation by sending a quick email to...

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Autism Awareness Month

Posted by on Apr 18, 2013 | 0 comments

In honor of Autism Awareness Month, the Law Office of Rebecca Geller is offering a 15% discount to new clients interested in creating a Special Needs Trust. A Special Needs Trust is an important legal tool for families with a child or loved one who receives public benefits to help with special needs. What is Special Needs Trust? A special needs trust is a legal tool that allows you to provide for a loved one with a disability who requires long-term medical or support needs. You can create such a trust now, or, through your will, you can direct that the trust be created with some or all of the assets in your estate. Why do I need a Special Needs Trust? Regardless of your loved one’s age, you should ensure that you leave assets in a way that does not affect his or her eligibility for government benefits. If a person dies without a will or leaves assets directly to a relative/child with special needs and that relative or child with special needs receives more than $2,000, most government benefits will be lost. Therefore, you should leave assets for a loved one with a disability directly to a special needs trust. Such a trust can provide money for “extras” that will improve your loved one’s quality of life without endangering his or her eligibility for government benefits. Some of these “extras” include home care, transportation, vacations, personal electronics, hobby or recreational items, or extraordinary medical care. Can’t I leave Money to the Guardian of My Special Needs Child Instead? Some people consider leaving money to a trusted relative for the long-term care of their loved one with a disability. Complications arise, however, when the trusted relative unexpectedly predeceases the disabled person, and the assets pass to someone without the commitment to meet your loved one’s needs. Without provisions in place like a Special Needs Trust, your loved one may have to survive on Social Security Insurance benefits alone, which are well below the poverty level. Careful planning via a Special Needs Trust can help prevent these problems. How Do I Get Started in Creating a Special Needs Trust? Send an email to Rebecca Geller at RGeller@thegellerlawgroup.com to schedule your free initial phone consult by May 7, 2013 to take advantage of the 15% discount for Special Needs Trusts. Living With Autism Fact According to the Autism Society, adults with autism have reported greater unmet healthcare needs, higher use of the emergency department, and lower rates of preventive services. They also reported poorer satisfaction with provider communication and lower comfort in navigating the health care system or managing their health. For these reasons and many others it is essential to ensure special needs family members’ needs are met through the use of a Special Needs...

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Why Do You Need a Special Needs Trust?

Posted by on Apr 9, 2013 | 0 comments

In honor of Autism Awareness Month, the Law Office of Rebecca Geller is offering a 15% discount to new clients interested in creating a Special Needs Trust.  A Special Needs Trust is an important legal tool for families with a child or loved one who receives public benefits to help with special needs. What is Special Needs Trust?   A special needs trust is a legal tool that allows you to provide for a loved one with a disability who requires long-term medical or support needs.  You can create such a trust now, or, through your will, you can direct that the trust be created with some or all of the assets in your estate. Why do I need a Special Needs Trust? Regardless of your loved one’s age, you should ensure that you leave assets in a way that does not affect his or her eligibility for government benefits.  If a person dies without a will or leaves assets directly to a relative/child with special needs and that relative orchild with special needs receives more than $2,000, most government benefits will be lost.  Therefore, you should leave assets for a loved one with a disability directly to a special needs trust.  Such a trust can provide money for “extras” that will improve your loved one’s quality of life without endangering his or her eligibility for government benefits.  Some of these “extras” include home care, transportation, vacations, personal electronics, hobby or recreational items, or extraordinary medical care. Can’t I leave Money to the Guardian of My Special Needs Child Instead? Some people consider leaving money to a trusted relative for the long-term care of their loved one with a disability.  Complications arise, however, when the trusted relative unexpectedly predeceases the disabled person, and the assets pass to someone without the commitment to meet your loved one’s needs.  Without provisions in place like a Special Needs Trust, your loved one may have to survive on Social Security Insurance benefits alone, which are well below the poverty level.  Careful planning via a Special Needs Trust can help prevent these problems. How Do I Get Started in Creating a Special Needs Trust? The Geller Law Group offers a free initial phone consult to anyone interested in a legal estate plan.  Please email her at RGeller@thegellerlawgroup.com to schedule yours...

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